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Monday, April 27, 2020 | History

1 edition of Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace found in the catalog.

Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace

Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace

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  • 248 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Congress of the U.S., Office of Technology Assessment in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • DNA fingerprinting,
  • Forensic genetics -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsUnited States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 26 p. :
    Number of Pages26
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14657114M


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Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace Paperback – October 1, by (Author)Author: The Online Books Page Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace.

Title: Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace: Author: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment: Note: Link: page images at HathiTrust: Link: PDF files at Princeton: Stable link here. Historically, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) has taken the position that genetic screening was not conceptually different from other types of medical testing or screening and that adherence to existing ethical standards, good scientific practices, and laws regulating medical confidentiality protected the rights of the individual appropriately, while allowing Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace book new information to be used to further safeguard the health of individuals in the workplace.

Occupational safety and health professionals and practitioners interested in Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace book use of genetic information in the workplace will be most informed by the chapters on the role of genetic information in the workplace, health records, genetic monitoring, genetic screening, and the ethical, social, and legal implications of this : $ Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace was requested by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation; House Committee on Energy and Commerce; and the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.

Genre/Form: Government publications: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace. Washington, D.C.: Congress of the.

Chapter 4-Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace: Corporate Opinion and Practice. Table Changes in Workplace Practice or Exposure Level Due to Results of Monitoring.

Q Has your company ever instituted or changed a workplace practice or exposure level due to the results of. Genetic screening is often advocated as a means of significantly reducing the incidence of occupational disease.

Employers can use information obtained from genetic testing to ensure that prospective or current employees are not placed in environments that might cause them harm. Genetic testing comes in two forms: screening and monitoring. Genetic monitoring (generally supported by labour advocates) detects genetic abnormalities potentially caused by exposure to workplace toxins.

It serves as an alert to hazards in the workplace, similar in principle to radiation detection badges. Genetic screening is often advocated as a means of significantly reducing the incidence of occupational disease. But critics of this emerging technology maintain that screening Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace book workers rights and increases racial and ethnic discrimination in the workplace.

In occupational safety and health practice, genetic tests may be used Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace book a variety of ways. Monitoring for the effects of exposure on genetic material, such as chromosomes, genes, and DNA, has been used to evaluate risks and potential health problems for more than 50 years, particularly those from ionizing radiation.

Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace. View/ Open. View/Open: PDF (MB) Bookview. Contributor. Biological monitoring and genetic screening in the industrial workplace: a synopsis and analysis  Field, Robert I.

() Related Items in Google Scholar ©— Bioethics Research Library. ACOEM Task Force on Genetic Screening in the Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace book Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: July - Volume 52 - Issue 7 - p doi: /JOM.0beebac 9.

See United States Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, Genetic Monitor-ing and Screening in the Workplace app. A, at () [hereinafter Office of Tech-nology Assessment, Genetic Monitoring]. See, e.g., Kaijala v.

Johns-Manville Prods. Corp., F.2d(8th by: 1. genetic information in the workplace will be most informed by the chapters on the role of genetic information in the workplace, health records, genetic monitoring, genetic screening, and the ethical, social, and legal implications of this information.

As with genetic susceptibility screening, it is necessary to consider whether employee participation in genetic monitoring programs should be mandatory or voluntary. As noted above, in some jurisdictions employees have a duty to co-operate with employers in the interests of workplace health and safety.

genetic screening to select job applicants and genetic monitoring of employees. This Article begins by explaining how genetic testing is used as a screening and monitoring tool.

4 In doing so, it also traces the history of discrimination based on genetic testing in the UnitedFile Size: 2MB.

In recent years, new and more intrusive surveillance technology has found its way into workplaces. New medical tests provide detailed information about workers' biology that was previously unthinkable. An increasing number of employees work under camera surveillance.

At the same time, computers allow for a detailed monitoring of our interactions with machines, and all this information can be. This paper discusses legal and ethical issues related to genetic screening. It is argued that persons identified with actual or perceived deleterious genetic markers are protected by the American with Disabilities Act of and the Civil Rights Act ofif members of a protected group, regardless of whether or not they are currently by: In the workplace, genetic information is usually the product of genetic screening or genetic monitoring, but may also be derived from a person's medical record.

issues associated specifically withgenetic monitoring and screening in the workplace, this Background Paper discusses survey results concerning the more general topic of medical monitoring and screening as well as providing additional information about genetic monitoring and screening.

The assessment was requested by the Senate Committee on. INTRODUCTION Since there is more than one purpose for genetic testing in the workplace, let us avoid confusion by differentiating between the two most commonly considered forms of genetic testing.

The first form of testing is referred to as genetic screening, the second form is genetic monitoring. Genetic screening is usually a single event. The Burlington Case brought the issue of workplace genetic testing to the halls of Congress. Senator Tom Daschle, (D-SD) introduced the "Genetic Nondiscrimination in Health Insurance and Employment Act" in (4) The bill would have put a limit on the ability of insurers and employers to use genetic information.

Genetic testing in the workplace encompasses two types of procedures —genetic monitoring and genetic screening. Genetic monitoring entails periodically examining a group of workers for chromosomal changes and DNA damage in order to pinpoint hazardous workplace substances which may increase the risk of cancer or other disorders for the group.

Trettin, Musham & Jablonski: Genetic Monitoring in the Workplace 33 biomedical and occupational medicine literature.

Much of the writing in this area discusses the relative advantages of genetic screening and monitoring using these definitions as a basis for comparison.4 Genetic screening focuses on the : Lillian Trettin, Catherine Musham, Richard Jablonski.

The terms medical surveillance and medical screening have sometimes been used interchangeably in the occupational medicine literature. Recently attempts have been made to redefine these as mutually exclusive, by nesting surveillance under screening or vice versa, by subsuming both under medical monitoring or periodic examinations, or by eliminating use of the term medical surveillance by: The Children of Atomic Bomb Survivors: A Genetic Study, ed.

by James V. Neel and William J. Schull (page images at NAP) Filed under: Genetic toxicology -- Political aspects -- United States. Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace (), by United States Congress Office of Technology Assessment.

page images at HathiTrust; PDF files. This is a book about "susceptibility policies," genetic techniques for identifying workers at high risk of disease and screening them out of hazardous employment.

Professor Draper argues that such. One form of biological surveillance that holds great promise is genetic monitoring. Unlike genetic screening, which looks for inherited familial traits that might contribute to hypersusceptibility, genetic monitoring uses cytogenetic techniques to examine chromosomes directly for damage resulting from environmental insults (Baselt, ; Levy.

past and potential future use of genetic screening exceeds that of genetic monitoring. The legal, social and ethical dilemmas relevant to this emerging controversial technology will be explored.

In particular, this Comment ex-amines the employer's duties to provide a safe working environment, the employee's rights implicated by genetic Cited by: 8. Well, that knowledge might be coming soon to a workplace near you. According to a recent report in the Wall Street Journal, some firms are making it possible for employees to get tested for genetic markers linked to risks of altered metabolism, obesity, and variations in eating behavior.

The report continues in Chapter 5 with a focus on genetic monitoring, followed in Chapter 6 by a theoretical discussion of genetic screening. The final chapter presents an overview of the most important aspects of this report, which are the ethical, social, and legal implications of genetics in the workplace.

The authors differentiate between genetic monitoring and screening, and discuss the potential risks and benefits of predictive testing technologies. Repository Citation Lillian Trettin, Catherine Musham & Richard Jablonski, Genetic Monitoring in the Workplace: A Tool Not a Solution, 10 RISK 31 ().Author: Lillian Trettin, Catherine Musham, Richard Jablonski.

in the Workplace and Monitoring the Worker for Exposure and Disease “Risky Business. is an important and timely book. Through her study of genetic screening in the workplace, Draper demonstrates how scientific and technological developments are assimilated in ways.

The Paperback of the Genetics in the Workplace: Implications for Occupational Safety and Health by Centers for Disease Cont and Prevention, National. Due to COVID, orders may be delayed.

Thank you for your patience. Book Annex Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events Help Auto Suggestions are available once you type at least 3 letters. Genetic testing, also known as DNA testing, is used to identify changes in DNA sequence or chromosome structure.

Genetic testing can also include measuring the results of genetic changes, such as RNA analysis as an output of gene expression, or through biochemical analysis to measure specific protein output.

In a medical setting, genetic testing can be used to diagnose or rule out suspected. Office of Tech. Assessment, U.S. Cong., Genetic Monitoring and Screening in the Workplace,(); see also Larry Gostin, Genetic Discrimination: The Use of Genetically Based Diagnostic and Prognostic Tests by Employers and Insurers, 17 AM.

& MEn.(); Jennifer Krumm, Why Congress Must Ban Genetic Testing in theFile Size: 7MB. Genetic monitoring is the use of molecular markers to (i) identify individuals, species or populations, or (ii) to quantify changes in population genetic metrics (such as effective population size, genetic diversity and population size) over time.

Genetic monitoring can thus be used to detect changes in species abundance and/or diversity, and has become an important tool in both conservation. Genetic testing and screening can help you find out of your baby could develop certain genetic conditions (passed on through your genes).

This is usually done when there is a family history of a major health problem that is likely to be passed on to the baby. surrounds the use of genetic testing in the work place. Though not yet common, workplace genetic testing is bound to become a real option for employers as genetic technologies improve.3 Genetic testing comes in two forms: screening and monitoring.

Genetic monitoring (which tends to be supported by labour advocates) detects. 1. Author(s): United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment. Title(s): Genetic monitoring and screening in the workplace.: summary.Future impact of genetic screening in occupational and download pdf medicine Roger G Rawbone Abstract New genetic technologies open up the possibility of predictive screening, both for individual genetic risk factors for sus-ceptibility to workplace hazards and for late onset (both single gene and multifac-torial) hereditary disease.

Although theCited by: Human Genome News, Ebook ; 4(2) OTA Surveys Genetic Screening in the Workplace. Medical Monitoring and Screening in ebook Workplace: Results of a Survey (), an page background paper from the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), draws upon the results of a survey about corporate practices and policies in medical and genetic monitoring and screening.